First cup of tea in Scotland was enjoyed in Clydesdale!

The story of Pettinain goes back, way into the mists of antiquity.

Friday, 25th June 2021, 6:15 pm
Updated Friday, 25th June 2021, 6:15 pm
Thatched cottages were a major feature at the beginning of the 20th century but they more or less disappeared as the population of Pettinain increased from 1900 to 1920.
Thatched cottages were a major feature at the beginning of the 20th century but they more or less disappeared as the population of Pettinain increased from 1900 to 1920.

On Bagmoors Farm Mesolithic tools made of chert were found in the 1950s, left by hunters and food gatherers making their way along the Clyde around 6000 BC.

Throughout history man made his mark on the area; in the Neolithic period a gigantic wooden henge monument was created for the worship of the sun and moon on Swaites Hill.

This is the second largest henge in the whole of the UK, constructed around 2700 BC.

The Bronze Age also left its mark in the form of a large number of cairns scattered over the ground between Swaites Hill and Cairngryffe.

The Archaeological Society finished the excavation of one of the Bronze Age Cairns on Cairngryffe Hill. As well as pottery, jewellery was found in the form of small circular cannel coal spacers. These would be strung and worn around the neck.

In more recent times a hoard of Bronze Age axes and spears were discovered, now housed in Lanark Museum.

In the Iron Age the summit of Cairngryffe was converted into a fortress. The interior of the fort was protected by an earth and stone bank known as a Murus Gallicus or Gallic Wall. It was this defence that would have confronted Agricola’s forces in 79 AD. The Romans, however, prevailed over the local Damononi – the Wild Bunch.

In the 12th century, the present Pettinain began to grow near the church. thanks to the white canons of St Mary of Dryburgh.

The Carmichaels paid for alterations to the church at the end of the 17th century. Some years earlier they built a residence for the eldest son at Westraw; it still stands today, although much altered.

Thatched cottages were a major feature at the beginning of the 20th century but they disappeared as the population of Pettinain increased from 1900 to 1920.

Finally, on the western flank of Cairngryffe, Clowburn Farm is the first place in Scotland where tea was drunk! Sir Andrew Kennedy’s wife inherited Clowburn in 1677. He received the tea from the East India Company as he was in charge of the Scottish Trading Mission in the Netherlands … so the family were the first to try out this exotic new drink!​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​