Jock’s Burn clean up bags huge haul of rubbish

Bags of rubbish pile up during the clear up.
Bags of rubbish pile up during the clear up.

Volunteers tidying up Jock’s Burn in Carluke have transformed the woodland beauty spot.

Volunteers tidying up Jock’s Burn in Carluke have transformed the woodland beauty spot.

The CCI squad

The CCI squad

Over the weeks of the clear-up, they have collected a staggering 200 bags of rubbish.

Their haul of junk inclded a lawnmower, mattress, bikes, fencing, computer chairs and even a rabbit hutch.

The volunteers put in a total of 365 hours altogether, in the project organised by the Clyde and Avon Valley Landscape Partnership.

The group called on local people to roll up their sleeves and volunteer on various dates in January and February, and their call to arms resulted in a hard-working group of 17 volunteers.

They lifted litter, dragged debris from the burn, and repaired the steps, while South Lanarkshire Council helped with path repairs.

The volunteer sessions were organised by Clydesdale Community Initiatives, along with the CAVLP which is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Willie Murphy of Clydesdale Community Initiatives, who was leading on the project says, “The clear up went really well.

“It has transformed from a rubbish tip into a pleasant setting for children and walkers alike.

“The volunteers were really fantastic and very motivated.”

Jock’s Burn is a little piece of nature in the heart of Carluke, but had been becoming run down over recent years, with fly tipping, and antisocial behaviour.

But new plans for the future, and the involvement of a new generation should mean that it is appreciated and cherished more in the years ahead.

It will be the setting for a new school orchard through a project with Central Scotland Green Network Trust (CSGNT), Carluke Development Trust (CDT) and no fewer than seven local primary schools.

Another project, Make Your Way, has also been working with schoolchildren, highlighting how it could be used for outdoor learning.

All the groups involved, and those diehard volunteers, are hoping that with so much interest now being shown in it the woodland’s future is secure.